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DSM-IV-TR Criteria

DSM-IV-TR CRITERIA

Substance Dependence Criteria
Substance dependence is defined as a maladaptive pattern of substance use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, as manifested by three (or more) of the following, occurring any time in the same 12-month period:
Tolerance, as defined by either of the following:

  • A need for markedly increased amounts of the substance to achieve intoxication or the desired effect or
  • Markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of the substance.

Withdrawal, as manifested by either of the following:

  • The characteristic withdrawal syndrome for the substance or
  • The same (or closely related) substance is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

The substance is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than intended.

There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control substance use.

A great deal of time is spent in activities necessary to obtain the substance, use the substance, or recover from its effects.

Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of substance use.

The substance use is continued despite knowledge of having a persistent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by the substance (for example, current cocaine use despite recognition of cocaine-induced depression or continued drinking despite recognition that an ulcer was made worse by alcohol consumption).

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

  • At least 6 months of "excessive anxiety and worry" about a variety of events and situations. Generally, "excessive" can be interpreted as more than would be expected for a particular situation or event. Most people become anxious over certain things, but the intensity of the anxiety typically corresponds to the situation.
  • There is significant difficulty in controlling the anxiety and worry. If someone has a very difficult struggle to regain control, relax, or cope with the anxiety and worry, then this requirement is met.
  • The presence for most days over the previous six months of 3 or more (only 1 for children) of the following symptoms:
    • Feeling wound-up, tense, or restless
    • Easily becoming fatigued or worn-out
    • Concentration problems
    • Irritability
    • Significant tension in muscles
    • Difficulty with sleep
  • The symptoms are not part of another mental disorder.
  • The symptoms cause "clinically significant distress" or problems functioning in daily life. "Clinically significant" is the part that relies on the perspective of the treatment provider. Some people can have many of the aforementioned symptoms and cope with them well enough to maintain a high level of functioning.
  • The condition is not due to a substance or medical issue

Major Depressive Episode 

  • Five (or more) of the following symptoms have been present during the same 2-week period and represent a change from previous functioning; at least one of the symptoms is either depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure. Note: Do not include symptoms that are clearly due to a general medical condition, or mood-incongruent delusions or hallucinations.
    • Depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day, as indicated by either subjective report (e.g., feels sad or empty) or observation made by others (e.g., appears tearful). Note: In children and adolescents, can be irritable mood.
    • Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of the day, nearly every day (as indicated by either subjective account or observation made by others)
    • Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain (e.g., a change of more than 5% of body weight in a month), or decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day. Note: In children, consider failure to make expected weight gains.
    • Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day
    • Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (observable by others, not merely subjective feelings of restlessness or being slowed down)
    • Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day
    • Feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt (which may be delusional) nearly every day (not merely self-reproach or guilt about being sick)
    • Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day (either by subjective account or as observed by others)
    • Recurrent thoughts of death (not just fear of dying), recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide
  • The symptoms do not meet criteria for a Mixed Episode. 
  • The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. 
  • The symptoms are not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., hypothyroidism). 
  • The symptoms are not better accounted for by bereavement, i.e., after the loss of a loved one, the symptoms persist for longer than 2 months or are characterized by marked functional impairment, morbid preoccupation with worthlessness, suicidal ideation, psychotic symptoms, or psychomotor retardation.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

  • The person has been exposed to traumatic event in which both of the following were present:
    • The person experienced, witnessed, or was confronted with an event or events that involved actual or threatened death or serious injury, or a threat to the physical integrity of self or others.
    • The person’s response involved intense fear, helplessness, or horror. Note: In children, this may be expressed instead by disorganized or agitated behavior.
  • The traumatic event is persistently re-experienced in one (or more)  ways: 
    • Recurrent and intrusive distressing recollections of the event, including images, thoughts, or perceptions. Note: In young children, repetitive play may occur in which themes or aspects of the trauma are expressed.
    • Recurrent distressing dreams of the event. Note: In young children, there may be frightening dreams without recognizable content.
    • Acting or feeling as if the traumatic event were recurring (includes a sense of reliving the experience, illusions, hallucinations, and dissociative flashback episodes, including those that occur on awakening or when intoxicated). Note: In young children, trauma-specific reenactment may occur.
    • Intense psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event; physiological reactivity on exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the event.
  • Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma and numbing of general responsiveness (not present before the trauma), as indicated by three (or more) of the following:
    • Efforts to avoid thoughts, feelings, or conversations associated with the trauma.
    • Efforts to avoid activities, places, or people that arouse recollections of trauma.
    • Inability to recall an important aspect of the trauma.
    • Markedly diminished interest or participation in significant activities.
    • Feeling of detachment or estrangement from others.
    • Restricted range of affect (e.g., unable to have loving feelings).
    • Sense of a foreshortened future (e.g., does not expect to have a career, marriage, children, or a normal life span).
  • Persistent symptoms of increased arousal (not present before the trauma), as indicated by two (or more) of the following:
    • Difficulty falling or staying asleep
    • Irritability or outbursts of anger
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Hypervigilance
    • Exaggerated startle response
  • Duration of the disturbance is more than 1 month.
  • The disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social activities, occupations, or other important area of functioning.