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The General Environment & Chronic Rhinosinusitis

chronic  rhinositis

We have been studying the epidemiology of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in Geisinger's patients. This is a chronic condition with a significant patient and population disease burden. It has many links to environmental exposures. The EHI at the Geisinger Health System in collaboration with Northwestern University, The University of Chicago and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have been awarded a program project grant (PO1) by the NIH to study the epidemiology, genetics and pathobiology of chronic rhinosinusitis. The collaborative group, collectively known as the Chronic Rhinosinusitis Integrative Studies Program (CRISP), is the only PO1 recipient in the United States studying this common but poorly understood disease. Program project grants are more complex in scope and budget than individual research grants, and are made available to a group of several investigators with differing areas of expertise who wish to collaborate in research by pooling their talents and resources. These resources will fund continued studies examining the genetic, environmental, molecular and immunologic underpinnings of CRS in order to discover new means of treating this disease. Project 1 of the CRISP is focused on the epidemiology of CRS, using both electronic health records and new primary data collection consisting of surveys, sinus CT scans, and sinus endoscopy in patients with nasal and sinus symptoms. This will allow us to develop new approaches to understanding the diagnosis, treatment, natural history, and risk factors for this common, disabling condition.

Publications

Tan BK, Chandra RK, Pollak J, Kato A, Conley DB, Peters AT, Grammer LC, Avila PC, Kern RC, Stewart WF, Schwartz BS. Incidence and associated premorbid diagonosis of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. J Allergy Clinical Immunology 2013 May; 131(5): 1350-60

Tan BK, Kern RB, Schleimer RP, Schwartz BS. Chronic rhinosinusitis - the unrecognized epidemic [editorial]. AJRCCM 2013 Dec; 188(11): 1275-7.